According to the National Park Service, LWCF has been used in every state and every county in the U.S. Here's a small sampling of the places LWCF has protected. 

Photo via The Trust for Public Land

Photo via The Trust for Public Land

Whitefish Lake, MT

LWCF funded work around Whitefish Lake in Montana not only provides opportunities for outdoor recreation, but also secures the city of Whitefish's water supply which comes from the lake. $2 million in funding has gone towards this multi-phase work which demonstrates a successful partnership between land managers and local business, while also receiving support from the local Congressional delegation. 

Photo via Natural History Museum of Utah

Photo via Natural History Museum of Utah

Bonneville shoreline trail, UT

Local governments, citizens, non-profits, and private landowners have been working with the U.S. Forest Service since 1991 to acquire and protect properties along the Bonneville Shoreline Trail (BST). Because the BST crosses scores of canyons that drain the Wasatch Mountains, residents along the trail – about 80 percent of all Utahans – rely on the lands along the BST for recreation access into the canyons and for watershed protection. LWCF funds have protected thousands of acres and ensured a high quality of life for the area’s residents, totaling over $15 million. As Salt Lake County Mayor Peter Corroon has stated, “Open space in our urban interface areas may well be one of the final frontiers. It’s no secret our valley is growing dramatically and with this project, and others, we will provide future generations with that elbow room we used to think was so readily available here in the Mountain West.”

 

Photo via NPS

Photo via NPS

cuyahoga valley national park, oh

Cuyahoga Valley National Park provides close-to-home recreation for residents of Cleveland and Akron, while also bringing in visitors from across the region. The park has received over $130 million in LWCF dollars, attracts 2.5 million visitors each year, which brings in an estimated $54.6 million to local businesses. It also offers locals a place to walk, bike, and run in a rapidly growing area.

Photo via Backcountry Hunters & Anglers

Photo via Backcountry Hunters & Anglers

The High Divide, MT & id

 In fiscal year 2016 the High Divide received $16 million for 18 projects that conserve 8,715 acres. The projects are securing wildlife migration bottlenecks in the Centennial and Big Hole Valleys, the Henry’s Lake/Island Park area, Sawtooth National Recreation Area, Upper Salmon, Pioneers and Birch Creek regions – public lands overseen by the Bureau of Land Management. They will protect 7 miles of riparian corridors and streams for Chinook salmon, steelhead and cutthroat trout, and 4,520 acres of critical sage grouse habitat. These projects have provided public access--including for hunting and fishing--to areas that were previously inaccessible. The acquisitions also allow for traditional land uses, including grazing.

Photo via NPS

Photo via NPS

Harper’s Ferry National Historic Park, wv

The site of several historic Civil War battles including the Historical General Stonewall Jackson famous siege and John Brown’s raid in 1859, Harper’s Ferry National Historic Park is one of the most important Civil War sites in the nation. This park, under the management of the National Park Service, has received over $11 million in LWCF funds.

The Civil War Trust, The Trust for Public Land, and several local organizations have been partners in the conservation of lands in Harper’s Ferry National Historic Park. Murphy’s Farm, a recent LWCF project, was protected from being developed into a 188 home subdivision, known as Murphy’s Landing, which would have included a 130-foot water tower visible from the entire park and surrounding battlefield sites.  The development proposal also called for a sewage plan that would dump an estimated 70,000 gallons of treated sewage daily into the Shenandoah River. Thanks to LWCF, Murphy’s Farm was protected in perpetuity in 2016.

 

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Top Photo: Skagit Wild & Scenic River, WA